Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies

Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies

If you’re looking to truly understand how Bitcoin works at a technical level and have a basic familiarity with computer science and programming, this book is for you. Researchers and advanced students will find the book useful as well.

Tag(s): Cryptography

Publication date: 09 Feb 2016

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: 308 pages

Views: 4,477

Type: Book

Publisher: n/a

License: n/a

Post time: 16 Apr 2016 03:00:00

Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies

Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies If you’re looking to truly understand how Bitcoin works at a technical level and have a basic familiarity with computer science and programming, this book is for you. Researchers and advanced students will find the book useful as well.
Tag(s): Cryptography
Publication date: 09 Feb 2016
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: 308 pages
Views: 4,477
Document Type: Book
Publisher: n/a
License: n/a
Post time: 16 Apr 2016 03:00:00
Introduction to the book:
Arvind Narayanan wrote:There's a lot of excitement about Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. Optimists claim that Bitcoin will fundamentally alter payments, economics, and even politics around the world. Pessimists claim Bitcoin is inherently broken and will suffer an inevitable and spectacular collapse. Underlying these differing views is significant confusion about what Bitcoin is and how it works. We wrote this book to help cut through the hype and get to the core of what makes Bitcoin unique. To really understand what is special about Bitcoin, we need to understand how it works at a technical level. Bitcoin truly is a new technology and we can only get so far by explaining it through simple analogies to past technologies. 

We'll assume that you have a basic understanding of computer science — how computers work, data structures and algorithms, and some programming experience. If you're an undergraduate or graduate student of computer science, a software developer, an entrepreneur, or a technology hobbyist, this textbook is for you. 




About The Author(s)


Joseph Bonneau is a postdoctoral researcher at the Applied Crypto Group at Stanford University and a Technology Fellow at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. His research interests include secure communication tools, cryptocurrencies, password and web authentication, and HTTPS and PKI on the web.

Joseph Bonneau

Joseph Bonneau is a postdoctoral researcher at the Applied Crypto Group at Stanford University and a Technology Fellow at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. His research interests include secure communication tools, cryptocurrencies, password and web authentication, and HTTPS and PKI on the web.


Edward W. Felten is a Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs at Princeton University, and is the founding Director of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy. His research interests include computer security and privacy, especially relating to media and consumer products; and technology law and policy.

Edward W. Felten

Edward W. Felten is a Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs at Princeton University, and is the founding Director of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy. His research interests include computer security and privacy, especially relating to media and consumer products; and technology law and policy.


Steven Goldfeder is a PhD student in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University. He's a member of the Security & Privacy Research Group, a CITP Graduate Student Fellow, and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. His research interests include cryptography, security, and privacy.

Steven Goldfeder

Steven Goldfeder is a PhD student in the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University. He's a member of the Security & Privacy Research Group, a CITP Graduate Student Fellow, and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. His research interests include cryptography, security, and privacy.


Andrew Miller is a computer science PhD student at the University of Maryland, in the Cybersecurity Center (MC2) and programming language lab (PLUM). His research interests include distributed systems, programming languages, and cryptography.

Andrew Miller

Andrew Miller is a computer science PhD student at the University of Maryland, in the Cybersecurity Center (MC2) and programming language lab (PLUM). His research interests include distributed systems, programming languages, and cryptography.


Arvind Narayanan is an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton. He researches and teaches information privacy and security, and moonlights in technology policy.

Arvind Narayanan

Arvind Narayanan is an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton. He researches and teaches information privacy and security, and moonlights in technology policy.


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