Scientific Computing

Scientific Computing

Lecture notes for Math 164: Scientific Computing, taught at Harvey Mudd College.

Publication date: 31 Jan 2017

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: 143 pages

Views: 5,373

Type: Lecture Notes

Publisher: n/a

License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong

Post time: 11 Jun 2017 04:00:00

Scientific Computing

Scientific Computing Lecture notes for Math 164: Scientific Computing, taught at Harvey Mudd College.
Tag(s): Differential Equations Linear Algebra Numerical Methods
Publication date: 31 Jan 2017
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: 143 pages
Views: 5,373
Document Type: Lecture Notes
Publisher: n/a
License: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong
Post time: 11 Jun 2017 04:00:00
Summary/Excerpts of (and not a substitute for) the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong:
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From the Preface:
Jeffrey R. Chasnov wrote:What follows are my lecture notes for Math 164: Scientific Computing, taught at Harvey Mudd College during Spring 2013 while I was on a one semester sabbatical leave from the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology. These lecture notes are based on two courses previously taught by me at HKUST: Introduction to Scientific Computation and Introduction to Numerical Methods. 

Math 164 at Harvey-Mudd is primarily for Math majors and supposes no previous knowledge of numerical analysis or methods. This course consists of both numerical methods and computational physics. The numerical methods content includes standard topics such as IEEE arithmetic, root finding, linear algebra, interpolation and least-squares, integration, differentiation, and differential equations. The physics content includes nonlinear dynamical systems with the pendulum as a model, and computational fluid dynamics with a focus on the steady two-dimensional flow past either a rectangle or a circle.




About The Author(s)


Dr. Chasnov is a Professor of Mathematics at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He received a BA and PhD in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley, and Columbia University in New York City, respectively. He had postdoctoral appointments at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, also in New York City, and at the Center for Turbulence Research, jointly sponsored by Stanford University and the NASA Ames Research Center in Northern California. His research interests are evolutionary genetics, turbulence, and scientific computation.

 Jeffrey R. Chasnov

Dr. Chasnov is a Professor of Mathematics at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He received a BA and PhD in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley, and Columbia University in New York City, respectively. He had postdoctoral appointments at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, also in New York City, and at the Center for Turbulence Research, jointly sponsored by Stanford University and the NASA Ames Research Center in Northern California. His research interests are evolutionary genetics, turbulence, and scientific computation.


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