A First Course in Complex Analysis

A First Course in Complex Analysis

This text was written for a one-semester undergraduate course developed at Binghamton University (SUNY) and San Francisco State University.

Publication date: 01 Jan 2015

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: 159 pages

Views: 3,337

Type: N/A

Publisher: Orthogonal Publishing L3C

License: n/a

Post time: 26 Jun 2016 11:00:00

A First Course in Complex Analysis

A First Course in Complex Analysis This text was written for a one-semester undergraduate course developed at Binghamton University (SUNY) and San Francisco State University.
Tag(s): Complex Analysis Mathematics
Publication date: 01 Jan 2015
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: 159 pages
Views: 3,337
Document Type: N/A
Publisher: Orthogonal Publishing L3C
License: n/a
Post time: 26 Jun 2016 11:00:00
About this book:
Matthias Beck wrote:A First Course in Complex Analysis was written for a one-semester undergraduate course developed at Binghamton University (SUNY) and San Francisco State University, and has been adopted at several other institutions. For many of our students, Complex Analysis is their first rigorous analysis (if not mathematics) class they take, and this book reflects this very much. We tried to rely on as few concepts from real analysis as possible. In particular, series and sequences are treated from scratch, which has the consequence that power series are introduced late in the course. The goal our book works toward is the Residue Theorem, including some nontraditional applications from both continuous and discrete mathematics.




About The Author(s)


Matthias Beck is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at San Francisco State University. He works in discrete and computational geometry and analytical number theory. He is particularly interested in problems and applications connected with lattice-point enumeration in polytopes.

Matthias Beck

Matthias Beck is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at San Francisco State University. He works in discrete and computational geometry and analytical number theory. He is particularly interested in problems and applications connected with lattice-point enumeration in polytopes.


Gerald Marchesi is a mathematics professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Binghamton University (SUNY) located in Binghamton, New York. 

Gerald Marchesi

Gerald Marchesi is a mathematics professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Binghamton University (SUNY) located in Binghamton, New York. 


Dennis Pixton is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Binghamton University. His areas of interests are dynamical systems and formal languages.

Dennis Pixton

Dennis Pixton is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Binghamton University. His areas of interests are dynamical systems and formal languages.


Lucas Sabalka is an applied mathematician at a technology company in Lincoln, Nebraska. He works on 3-dimensional computer vision applications. He was formerly a professor of mathematics at St. Louis University, after postdoctoral positions at UC Davis and Binghamton University (SUNY). His mathematical research interests are in geometric group theory, low dimensional topology, and computational algebra.

Lucas Sabalka

Lucas Sabalka is an applied mathematician at a technology company in Lincoln, Nebraska. He works on 3-dimensional computer vision applications. He was formerly a professor of mathematics at St. Louis University, after postdoctoral positions at UC Davis and Binghamton University (SUNY). His mathematical research interests are in geometric group theory, low dimensional topology, and computational algebra.


Book Categories
Sponsors
Icons8, a free icon pack