CS 276: Cryptography

CS 276: Cryptography

Notes from a graduate course on Cryptography offered at the University of California, Berkeley. Familiarity with the notions of algorithm and running time, as well as with basic notions of algebra, discrete math and probability is required.

Publication date: 19 May 2011

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: 154 pages

Views: 1,943

Type: Lecture Notes

Publisher: n/a

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported

Post time: 21 Oct 2016 04:00:00

CS 276: Cryptography

CS 276: Cryptography Notes from a graduate course on Cryptography offered at the University of California, Berkeley. Familiarity with the notions of algorithm and running time, as well as with basic notions of algebra, discrete math and probability is required.
Tag(s): Computer Security
Publication date: 19 May 2011
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: 154 pages
Views: 1,943
Document Type: Lecture Notes
Publisher: n/a
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
Post time: 21 Oct 2016 04:00:00
Summary/Excerpts of (and not a substitute for) the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported:
You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Click here to read the full license.
Note:

More resources are available at the course webpage.

From the Introduction:
Trevisan wrote:This course assumes CS170, or equivalent, as a prerequisite. We will assume that the reader is familiar with the notions of algorithm and running time, as well as with basic notions of algebra (for example arithmetic in finite fields), discrete math and probability. General information about the class, including prerequisites, grading, and recommended references, are available on the class home page. 

Cryptography is the mathematical foundation on which one builds secure systems. It studies ways of securely storing, transmitting, and processing information. Understanding what cryptographic primitives can do, and how they can be composed together, is necessary to build secure systems, but not sufficient. Several additional considerations go into the design of secure systems, and they are covered in various Berkeley graduate courses on security.




About The Author(s)


Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at U.C. Berkeley and senior scientist at the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing. Studied at the Sapienza University of Rome, advised by Pierluigi Crescenzi. Took a post-doc at MIT (with the Theory of Computing Group) and at DIMACS, joined as an assistant professor at Columbia University and a professor at Stanford. Interested in Theoretical Computer Science.

Luca Trevisan

Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at U.C. Berkeley and senior scientist at the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing. Studied at the Sapienza University of Rome, advised by Pierluigi Crescenzi. Took a post-doc at MIT (with the Theory of Computing Group) and at DIMACS, joined as an assistant professor at Columbia University and a professor at Stanford. Interested in Theoretical Computer Science.


Book Categories
Sponsors
Icons8, a free icon pack