Databases, Types and the Relational Model - The Third Manifesto

Databases, Types and the Relational Model - The Third Manifesto

An essential reading for database professionals, this book can be seen as an abstract blueprint for the design of a DBMS and the language interface to such a DBMS.

Publication date: 06 Mar 2006

ISBN-10: 0321399420

ISBN-13: 9780321399427

Paperback: 604 pages

Views: 2,085

Type: Book

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

License: Standard Copyright License

Post time: 10 Nov 2016 12:00:00

Databases, Types and the Relational Model - The Third Manifesto

Databases, Types and the Relational Model - The Third Manifesto An essential reading for database professionals, this book can be seen as an abstract blueprint for the design of a DBMS and the language interface to such a DBMS.
Tag(s): Relational Database
Publication date: 06 Mar 2006
ISBN-10: 0321399420
ISBN-13: 9780321399427
Paperback: 604 pages
Views: 2,085
Document Type: Book
Publisher: Addison-Wesley
License: Standard Copyright License
Post time: 10 Nov 2016 12:00:00
From the Back Cover:
Date and Darwen wrote:Databases, Types, and the Relational Model: The Third Manifesto is a proposal for the future direction of data and database management systems (DBMSs). It provides a precise, formal definition of an abstract model of data, to be considered as a foundation for the design of a DBMS and a database language.
 
The proposed foundation represents an evolutionary step, not a revolutionary one; it builds on Ted Codd's relational model of data and on the research that sprang from Codd's work. It also incorporates a precise and comprehensive specification for a method of defining data types, including a comprehensive model of type inheritance based on specialization by constraint (as opposed to the “extension” method of subtyping found in object-oriented languages). Thus, it not only redefines the relational model in modern terms and clarifies it where clarification seemed necessary, but also addresses the orthogonal issue of the data types on whose existence the relational model depends. It is therefore offered as a firm foundation for the DBMSs of the future and is essential reading for database students and professionals alike.

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About The Author(s)


Hugh Darwen was employed in IBM's software development divisions from 1967 to 2004. In the early part of his career, he was involved in DBMS development; from 1978 to 1982,he was one of the chief architects of an IBM product called Business System 12, a product that faithfully embraced the principles of the relational model. He was an active participant in the development of the international standard for SQL (and related standards) from 1988 to 2004. Based in the U.K., he currently teaches relational database theory at Warwick University and is a tutor and course development consultant for the Open University.

Hugh Darwen

Hugh Darwen was employed in IBM's software development divisions from 1967 to 2004. In the early part of his career, he was involved in DBMS development; from 1978 to 1982,he was one of the chief architects of an IBM product called Business System 12, a product that faithfully embraced the principles of the relational model. He was an active participant in the development of the international standard for SQL (and related standards) from 1988 to 2004. Based in the U.K., he currently teaches relational database theory at Warwick University and is a tutor and course development consultant for the Open University.


C.J. Date is an independent author, lecturer, researcher, and consultant, specializing in relational database technology (a field he helped pioneer). He is best known for his book "An Introduction to Database Systems" (8th edition, Addison-Wesley, 2004), which has sold over 825,000 copies at the time of writing and is used by several hundred colleges and universities worldwide. He is also the author of many other books on database management, including most recently "SQL and Relational Theory: How to Write Accurate SQL Code" (O'Reilly, 2009). He was inducted into the Computing Industry Hall of Fame in 2004. 

Christopher J. Date

C.J. Date is an independent author, lecturer, researcher, and consultant, specializing in relational database technology (a field he helped pioneer). He is best known for his book "An Introduction to Database Systems" (8th edition, Addison-Wesley, 2004), which has sold over 825,000 copies at the time of writing and is used by several hundred colleges and universities worldwide. He is also the author of many other books on database management, including most recently "SQL and Relational Theory: How to Write Accurate SQL Code" (O'Reilly, 2009). He was inducted into the Computing Industry Hall of Fame in 2004. 


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