Designing Business Information Systems: Apps, Websites, and More

Designing Business Information Systems: Apps, Websites, and More

This book is designed to help students get a feel for what a career in MIS would be like. Most of this book is a case. Tools are introduced when needed, and only to the extent needed, to get at each part of the case.

Publication date: 29 Dec 2012

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: 318 pages

Views: 2,634

Type: Book

Publisher: n/a

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Post time: 28 Nov 2016 08:30:00

Designing Business Information Systems: Apps, Websites, and More

Designing Business Information Systems: Apps, Websites, and More This book is designed to help students get a feel for what a career in MIS would be like. Most of this book is a case. Tools are introduced when needed, and only to the extent needed, to get at each part of the case.
Tag(s): Information Systems
Publication date: 29 Dec 2012
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: 318 pages
Views: 2,634
Document Type: Book
Publisher: n/a
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
Post time: 28 Nov 2016 08:30:00
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From the Preface:
Frost, Kenyo, Pike, and Pels wrote:Students in an introductory Management Information Systems (MIS) course often ask what a career in MIS looks like. Lacking a clear vision, they make their own assumptions. Often they assume the career involves programming with little human interaction. That MIS is a technical field could not be further from the truth. MIS job descriptions typically require candidates to be able to collaborate, communicate, analyze needs and gather requirements. They also list the need for excellent written and communication skills. In other words, MIS workers are constantly interacting with other people both inside and outside the organization. They are coming up with creative solutions to business problems. 

This course is designed to help students get a feel for what a career in MIS would be like. Our students report that they learn more about information systems from their internships than from their IS courses. Consequently, we designed a course that looks very much like an internship—an introduction to the field followed by a substantial project.




About The Editor(s)


Backend and Frontend Problem-Solver at Matasano Security.

Andy Schmitz

Backend and Frontend Problem-Solver at Matasano Security.


About The Author(s)


Raymond D. Frost is a Professor of Management Information Systems department at Ohio University. He is also the Director of Studies for College of Business students in the Honors Tutorial College (HTC). Frost joined the College of Business in 1999. His primary research areas are instructional pedagogy, information design, and database design. He was named 2010 Computer Educator of the Year by the International Association for Computer Information Systems.

Raymond D. Frost

Raymond D. Frost is a Professor of Management Information Systems department at Ohio University. He is also the Director of Studies for College of Business students in the Honors Tutorial College (HTC). Frost joined the College of Business in 1999. His primary research areas are instructional pedagogy, information design, and database design. He was named 2010 Computer Educator of the Year by the International Association for Computer Information Systems.


Lauren N. Kenyo is an instructor in the Management Information Systems at Ohio University. After graduating from Ohio University’s College of Business she went on to graduate from Ohio’s Masters of Business Administration Program. In 2004 Kenyo came back to join the faculty as in instructor in the Management Information Systems department. 

Lauren N. Kenyo

Lauren N. Kenyo is an instructor in the Management Information Systems at Ohio University. After graduating from Ohio University’s College of Business she went on to graduate from Ohio’s Masters of Business Administration Program. In 2004 Kenyo came back to join the faculty as in instructor in the Management Information Systems department. 


Sarah E. Pels is an Honors Tutorial College student in the College of Business at Ohio University. Her research interests include creating diagrams to aid in software instruction.

Sarah E. Pels

Sarah E. Pels is an Honors Tutorial College student in the College of Business at Ohio University. Her research interests include creating diagrams to aid in software instruction.


Jacqueline C. Pike is an Assistant Professor of Information Systems Management in the Palumbo-Donahue School of Business at Duquesne University. Her research interests include behavior in public online communities and social computing environments, the utilization of public online communities by organizations, human-computer interaction, and the visual display of information in a systems context.

Jacqueline C. Pike

Jacqueline C. Pike is an Assistant Professor of Information Systems Management in the Palumbo-Donahue School of Business at Duquesne University. Her research interests include behavior in public online communities and social computing environments, the utilization of public online communities by organizations, human-computer interaction, and the visual display of information in a systems context.


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