Embedding Perl in HTML with Mason

Embedding Perl in HTML with Mason

This book shows the readers how to create large, complex, dynamically driven web sites that look good and are a snap to maintain using Perl and Mason.

Tag(s): Perl

Publication date: 01 Oct 2002

ISBN-10: 0596002254

ISBN-13: 9780596002251

Paperback: 318 pages

Views: 13,820

Type: Book

Publisher: O’Reilly Media, Inc.

License: Open Publication License

Post time: 15 Sep 2006 06:54:04

Embedding Perl in HTML with Mason

Embedding Perl in HTML with Mason This book shows the readers how to create large, complex, dynamically driven web sites that look good and are a snap to maintain using Perl and Mason.
Tag(s): Perl
Publication date: 01 Oct 2002
ISBN-10: 0596002254
ISBN-13: 9780596002251
Paperback: 318 pages
Views: 13,820
Document Type: Book
Publisher: O’Reilly Media, Inc.
License: Open Publication License
Post time: 15 Sep 2006 06:54:04
Summary/Excerpts of (and not a substitute for) the Open Publication License:
The Open Publication works may be reproduced and distributed in whole or in part, in any medium physical or electronic, provided that the terms of this license are adhered to, and that this license or an incorporation of it by reference (with any options elected by the author(s) and/or publisher) is displayed in the reproduction. 

Click here to read the full license.
Update 10/11/2017:

The download link has been updated.

Book Excerpts:

Mason is a tool for embedding the Perl programming language into text, in order to create text dynamically, most often in HTML. But Mason does not simply stop at HTML. It can just as easily create XML, WML, POD, configuration files, or the complete works of Shakespeare.

Mason doesn't aim to be the one true Perl-based templating system for building web sites, but it's led many programmers to abandon their custom solutions when they've seen how much easier using Mason can be. It's a powerful, open source, Perl-based web site development and delivery engine, with features that make it an ideal backend for high load sites serving dynamic content.

Although using Mason isn't difficult, creating a Mason-based site can be tricky. Embedding Perl in HTML with Mason, written by members of Mason's core development team, shows readers how to take advantage of Mason's strengths while avoiding the obstacles that inexperienced users may encounter. Mason's unique features, when used properly, can streamline the design of a web site or application. This concise book covers these features from several angles, and includes a study of the authors' sample site where these features are used.

This book shows readers how to create large, complex, dynamically driven web sites that look good and are a snap to maintain. Readers will learn how to visualize multiple Mason-based solutions to any given problem and select among them. The book covers the latest line of Mason development 1.1x, which has many new features, including line number reporting based on source files, sub-requests, and easier use as a CGI. This is an essential reading for any Perl programmer who wants to simplify web site design.

Intended Audience:

This book assumes that readers is familiar with Perl at an intermediate level and that common Perl idioms don't stop them in their tracks. While readers need not have written their own modules previously, familiarity with Perl's object-oriented syntax will be helpful.

Reviews:

Amazon.com

:? "But.. it is a little too short. Not really but I would have loved to have more book. The book covers just about every topic. I personally would have enjoyed to have more examples in each area."

:? "This book is not needed to get in touch with Mason althought usefull - but if you are really starting to deploy a site I strongly recommend this book."

Andy Lester

:) "So should you buy the book, if masonhq.com has extensive documentation? If you're new to Mason, it's well worth your $35 to have a guided introduction. To the experienced Mason developer, there's still an advantage to seeing Mason code written the way that the authors intended, or learn a new idiom."

Simon Cozens

:? "That also means, however, that I've had high expectations of it; Rolsky and Williams' effort has lived up to many of them but let me down in a few areas."
 




About The Author(s)


Ken Williams enjoys sitting by the park and taking long walks in the fireplace. He has a hard time staying interested in any one thing for very long, so he has recently worked as a math teacher, choral conductor, Perl consultant, and liturgical bongoist. He has written CPAN modules of varying utility while masquerading under the seedy, secretive pseudonym "Ken Williams". Ken joined the Mason core team in the fall of 2000 and has managed to convince the other core members that his flashy looks and his appeal with Mason's ultra-hep Gen-Z users outweigh his tendency to forget what planet he's on. He recently moved to Australia to study Document Categorization, and that's not a joke.

Ken Williams

Ken Williams enjoys sitting by the park and taking long walks in the fireplace. He has a hard time staying interested in any one thing for very long, so he has recently worked as a math teacher, choral conductor, Perl consultant, and liturgical bongoist. He has written CPAN modules of varying utility while masquerading under the seedy, secretive pseudonym "Ken Williams". Ken joined the Mason core team in the fall of 2000 and has managed to convince the other core members that his flashy looks and his appeal with Mason's ultra-hep Gen-Z users outweigh his tendency to forget what planet he's on. He recently moved to Australia to study Document Categorization, and that's not a joke.


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