Exercises and Problems in Calculus

Exercises and Problems in Calculus

A set of exercises and problems for a (more or less) standard beginning calculus sequence.

Tag(s): Calculus

Publication date: 01 Aug 2013

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: 374 pages

Views: 2,062

Type: Textbook

Publisher: n/a

License: n/a

Post time: 08 Dec 2016 08:00:00

Exercises and Problems in Calculus

Exercises and Problems in Calculus A set of exercises and problems for a (more or less) standard beginning calculus sequence.
Tag(s): Calculus
Publication date: 01 Aug 2013
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: 374 pages
Views: 2,062
Document Type: Textbook
Publisher: n/a
License: n/a
Post time: 08 Dec 2016 08:00:00
From the Preface:
John Erdman wrote:This is a set of exercises and problems for a (more or less) standard beginning calculus sequence. While a fair number of the exercises involve only routine computations, many of the exercises and most of the problems are meant to illuminate points that in my experience students have found confusing. 

John Erdman wrote:This collection is divided into parts and chapters roughly by topic. Many chapters begin with a "background" section. This is most emphatically not intended to serve as an exposition of the relevant material. It is designed only to fix notation, definitions, and conventions (which vary widely from text to text) and to clarify what topics one should have studied before tackling the exercises and problems that follow. 

The flood of elementary calculus texts published in the past half century shows, if nothing else, that the topics discussed in a beginning calculus course can be covered in virtually any order. The divisions into chapters in these notes, the order of the chapters, and the order of items within a chapter is in no way intended to reflect opinions I have about the way in which (or even if) calculus should be taught. For the convenience of those who might wish to make use of these notes I have simply chosen what seems to me one fairly common ordering of topics. Neither the exercises nor the problems are ordered by difficulty. Utterly trivial problems sit alongside ones requiring substantial thought.




About The Author(s)


Emeritus Associate Professor in the Fariborz Maseeh Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Portland State University. His areas of speciality are Functional Analysis and Operator Theory.

John M. Erdman

Emeritus Associate Professor in the Fariborz Maseeh Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Portland State University. His areas of speciality are Functional Analysis and Operator Theory.


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