GNU Octave: A high-level interactive language for numerical computations

GNU Octave: A high-level interactive language for numerical computations

This manual is the definitive guide to GNU Octave, an interactive environment for numerical computation which provides command-line interface for solving linear and nonlinear problems using vectors and matrices.

Publication date: 01 Mar 2002

ISBN-10: 0954161726

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: 324 pages

Views: 16,966

Type: N/A

Publisher: Network Theory Ltd

License: GNU General Public License

Post time: 04 Nov 2006 02:53:59

GNU Octave: A high-level interactive language for numerical computations

GNU Octave: A high-level interactive language for numerical computations This manual is the definitive guide to GNU Octave, an interactive environment for numerical computation which provides command-line interface for solving linear and nonlinear problems using vectors and matrices.
Tag(s): Numerical Methods
Publication date: 01 Mar 2002
ISBN-10: 0954161726
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: 324 pages
Views: 16,966
Document Type: N/A
Publisher: Network Theory Ltd
License: GNU General Public License
Post time: 04 Nov 2006 02:53:59
Terms and Conditions:
Network Theory Limited wrote:GNU Octave is free software --- the complete source code is available under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL). All the money raised from the sale of this book supports the development of free software. For each copy sold $1 will be donated to the GNU Octave Development Fund.


Book Excerpts:

This manual is the definitive guide to GNU Octave, an interactive environment for numerical computation.

Octave was originally intended to be companion software for an undergraduate-level textbook on chemical reactor design being written by James B. Rawlings of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and John G. Ekerdt of the University of Texas.

Clearly, Octave is now much more than just another "courseware" package with limited utility beyond the classroom. Although the initial goals were somewhat vague, it was intended since the beginning to create something that would enable students to solve realistic problems, and that they could use for many things other than chemical reactor design problems.

There are those who would say that the students should be taught Fortran instead, because that is the computer language of engineering, but the students ended up spending far too much time trying to figure out why their Fortran code crashes and not enough time learning about chemical engineering. With Octave, most students pick up the basics quickly, and are using it confidently in just a few hours.

Although it was originally intended to be used to teach reactor design, it has been used in several other undergraduate and graduate courses in the Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Texas, and the Department of Mathematics at the University of Texas has been using it for teaching differential equations and linear algebra as well.
 




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John W. Eaton

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