Linux in the Workplace - How to Use Linux in Your Office

Linux in the Workplace - How to Use Linux in Your Office

Covers how to use Linux for day-to-day jobs involving email, the Web, working with documents, and performing general office tasks.

Tag(s): GNU/Linux

Publication date: 31 Dec 2002

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: n/a

Views: 18,773

Type: N/A

Publisher: No Starch Press

License: GNU Free Documentation License Version 1.2

Post time: 08 Jul 2005 11:14:25

Linux in the Workplace - How to Use Linux in Your Office

Linux in the Workplace - How to Use Linux in Your Office Covers how to use Linux for day-to-day jobs involving email, the Web, working with documents, and performing general office tasks.
Tag(s): GNU/Linux
Publication date: 31 Dec 2002
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: n/a
Views: 18,773
Document Type: N/A
Publisher: No Starch Press
License: GNU Free Documentation License Version 1.2
Post time: 08 Jul 2005 11:14:25
Summary/Excerpts of (and not a substitute for) the GNU Free Documentation License Version 1.2:
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts.  A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License".

Click here to read the full license.
:santagrin: This book was suggested by : zero0w

Book excerpts:

Traditionally, Linux has been a favorite operating system of the more technically literate computer users. So, you'll find many Linux books that tell you Linux is like UNIX (it is), how to load Linux, why Linux is great, and how to do specific things with Linux (such as run a webserver). There are also many books that go into great detail about how to use specific software available for Linux (such as The GIMP graphics program), as well as books that compare Microsoft Windows' features to those of Linux.

This book is different in that it assumes you don't want to install Linux, don't want to learn how to be a system administrator, and aren't concerned with doing some of the more complicated tasks. This book assumes you already have a working Linux system on your desk and need to use it to get your work done. That work probably involves email, the Web, working with documents, and performing general office tasks. Additionally, this book assumes that, in most cases, you will want to use the KDE graphical user interface (GUI) that comes with Linux to perform these tasks. (Of course, once you become proficient at all these tasks, you may want to learn what the command line is and how to do some tasks more efficiently from it.)




About The Author(s)


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John Mark

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