Making TeX Work

Making TeX Work

Guides the readers through the tools available in the overall TeX system. Describes all drivers, macro packages, previewers, printing programs, online documentation facilities, and graphics programs, beyond the core TeX program.

Publication date: 11 Apr 1994

ISBN-10: 1565920511

ISBN-13: 9781565920514

Paperback: 522 pages

Views: 10,831

Type: N/A

Publisher: O’Reilly Media, Inc.

License: GNU Free Documentation License

Post time: 12 Feb 2007 04:09:35

Making TeX Work

Making TeX Work Guides the readers through the tools available in the overall TeX system. Describes all drivers, macro packages, previewers, printing programs, online documentation facilities, and graphics programs, beyond the core TeX program.
Tag(s): Digital Libraries
Publication date: 11 Apr 1994
ISBN-10: 1565920511
ISBN-13: 9781565920514
Paperback: 522 pages
Views: 10,831
Document Type: N/A
Publisher: O’Reilly Media, Inc.
License: GNU Free Documentation License
Post time: 12 Feb 2007 04:09:35
Summary/Excerpts of (and not a substitute for) the GNU Free Documentation License:
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License". 

Click here to read the full license.
Book Excerpts:

TeX is a tool for creating professional quality, typeset pages of any kind. It is particularly good, perhaps unsurpassed, at typesetting mathematics ; as a result, it is widely used in scientific writing. Some of its other features, like its ability to handle multiple languages in the same document and the fact that the content of a document (chapters, sections, equations, tables, figures, etc.) can be separated from its form (typeface, size, spacing, indentation, etc.) are making TeX more common outside of scientific and academic circles.

Designed by Donald Knuth in the late 1970s, more than a decade of refinement has gone into the program called "TeX" today. The resulting system produces publication-quality output while maintaining portability across an extremely wide range of platforms.

Remarkably, TeX is free. This fact, probably as much as any other, has contributed to the development of a complete "TeX system" by literally thousands of volunteers. TeX, the program, forms the core of this environment and is now supported by hundreds of tools.

Intended Audience:

This book is for anyone who uses TeX. Novices will need at least one other reference, because this book does not describe the nuts and bolts of writing documents with TeX in any great detail.

If you are new to TeX, there is much to learn. There are many books that describe how to use TeX. However, the focus of this book is mostly at a higher level. After digesting Chapter 1, you should be able to proceed through the rest of the book without much difficulty even if you have never seen TeX before. So, if you are a system administrator interested in learning enough about these programs to install and test them for your users, you should be all set. If you are interested in learning how to write documents with TeX, this book will be helpful, but it will not be wholly sufficient.

Although many individual components of the TeX system are well documented, there has never before been a complete reference to the whole system. This book surveys the entire world of TeX software and helps you see how the various pieces are related.

Reviews:

Amazon.com

:| "Overall, a nice book for the TeX library, but not an essential. A good book for the beginner TeX user, but advanced users probably won't get much out of it."
 




About The Author(s)


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Norman Walsh

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