prolog :- tutorial

prolog :- tutorial

This tutorial is intended to be used to help learn the essential, basic concepts of Prolog. The sample programs have been especially chosen to help promote the use of Prolog programming in an artificial intelligence course.

Publication date: 31 Dec 2004

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: n/a

Views: 27,293

Type: N/A

Publisher: n/a

License: n/a

Post time: 17 Aug 2006 11:42:10

prolog :- tutorial

prolog :- tutorial This tutorial is intended to be used to help learn the essential, basic concepts of Prolog. The sample programs have been especially chosen to help promote the use of Prolog programming in an artificial intelligence course.
Tag(s): Logic Programming
Publication date: 31 Dec 2004
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: n/a
Views: 27,293
Document Type: N/A
Publisher: n/a
License: n/a
Post time: 17 Aug 2006 11:42:10
Terms and Conditions:
J. R. Fisher wrote:Please notify the author before including a link to any of the pages in this tutorial. Permission to copy is denied. Permission to link is freely granted.

 

Tutorial excerpts:

Prolog is the major example of a fourth generation programming language supporting the declarative programming paradigm. The programs in this tutorial are written in 'standard' University of Edinburgh Prolog, as specified in the classic Prolog textbook by authors Clocksin and Mellish (1981,1992). Some references in this tutorial also use a version of PrologII, a family of Prolog which are the descendants of the 'first' Prolog, Marseille Prolog. There are differences between these two varieties of Prolog; part of the difference is syntax, and part is semantics. However, students who learn either kind of Prolog can easily adapt to the other kind.

This tutorial is intended to be used to help learn the essential, basic concepts of Prolog. The sample programs have been especially chosen to help promote the use of Prolog programming in an artificial intelligence course. Lisp and Prolog are the most frequently used symbolic programming languages for artificial intelligence. They are widely regarded as excellent languages for 'exploratory' and 'prototype programming'.

Earlier versions of portions of this tutorial date back to 1988. The introductory material was used to help explain and promote an extended Prolog interpreter developed by the author. The introductory material, gathered together in the form given here might be very useful for the student who wants a quick, but well-tailored, introduction to Prolog.
 




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J. R. Fisher

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