Real World Haskell

Real World Haskell

This book shows the readers how to use functional programming and Haskell to solve realistic problems. This is a hands-on book: every chapter contains dozens of code samples, and many contain complete applications.

Publication date: 31 Dec 2008

ISBN-10: 0596514980

ISBN-13: 9780596514983

Paperback: 714 pages

Views: 12,903

Type: Book

Publisher: O’Reilly Media, Inc.

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported

Post time: 29 Apr 2009 07:02:42

Real World Haskell

Real World Haskell This book shows the readers how to use functional programming and Haskell to solve realistic problems. This is a hands-on book: every chapter contains dozens of code samples, and many contain complete applications.
Tag(s): Functional Programming
Publication date: 31 Dec 2008
ISBN-10: 0596514980
ISBN-13: 9780596514983
Paperback: 714 pages
Views: 12,903
Document Type: Book
Publisher: O’Reilly Media, Inc.
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported
Post time: 29 Apr 2009 07:02:42
Summary/Excerpts of (and not a substitute for) the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported:
You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Click here to read the full license.
Excerpts from the Introduction:
Bryan O'Sullivan wrote:We started this project because a growing number of people are using Haskell to solve everyday problems. Because Haskell has its roots in academia, few of the Haskell books that currently exist focus on the problems and techniques of everyday programming that we're interested in.

With this book, we want to show you how to use functional programming and Haskell to solve realistic problems. This is a hands-on book: every chapter contains dozens of code samples, and many contain complete applications. Here are a few examples of the libraries, techniques and tools that we'll show you how to develop.

- Create an application that downloads podcast episodes from the Internet, and stores its history in an SQL database.

- Test your code in an intuitive and powerful way. Describe properties that ought to be true, then let the QuickCheck library generate test cases automatically.

- Take a grainy phone camera snapshot of a barcode, and turn it into an identifier that you can use to query a library or bookseller's web site.

- Write code that thrives on the web. Exchange data with servers and clients written in other languages using JSON notation. Develop a concurrent link checker.




About The Author(s)


John Goerzen is an American hacker and author. He has written a number of real-world Haskell libraries and applications, including the HDBC database interface, the ConfigFile configuration file interface, a podcast downloader, and various other libraries relating to networks, parsing, logging, and POSIX code. John has been a developer for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system project for over 10 years and maintains numerous Haskell libraries and code for Debian. He also served as President of Software in the Public Interest, Inc., the legal parent organization of Debian.

John Goerzen

John Goerzen is an American hacker and author. He has written a number of real-world Haskell libraries and applications, including the HDBC database interface, the ConfigFile configuration file interface, a podcast downloader, and various other libraries relating to networks, parsing, logging, and POSIX code. John has been a developer for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system project for over 10 years and maintains numerous Haskell libraries and code for Debian. He also served as President of Software in the Public Interest, Inc., the legal parent organization of Debian.


Bryan O'Sullivan is an Irish hacker and writer who likes distributed systems, open source software, and programming languages. He was a member of the initial design team for the Jini network service architecture (subsequently open sourced as Apache River). He has made significant contributions to, and written a book about, the popular Mercurial revision control system. He lives in San Francisco with his wife and sons. Whenever he can, he runs off to climb rocks.

Bryan O'Sullivan

Bryan O'Sullivan is an Irish hacker and writer who likes distributed systems, open source software, and programming languages. He was a member of the initial design team for the Jini network service architecture (subsequently open sourced as Apache River). He has made significant contributions to, and written a book about, the popular Mercurial revision control system. He lives in San Francisco with his wife and sons. Whenever he can, he runs off to climb rocks.


Don Stewart is an Australian hacker based in Portland, Oregon. Don has been involved in a diverse range of Haskell projects, including practical libraries, such as Data.ByteString and Data.Binary, as well as applying the Haskell philosophy to real-world applications including compilers, linkers, text editors, network servers, and systems software. His recent work has focused on optimizing Haskell for high-performance scenarios, using techniques from term rewriting.

Don Stewart

Don Stewart is an Australian hacker based in Portland, Oregon. Don has been involved in a diverse range of Haskell projects, including practical libraries, such as Data.ByteString and Data.Binary, as well as applying the Haskell philosophy to real-world applications including compilers, linkers, text editors, network servers, and systems software. His recent work has focused on optimizing Haskell for high-performance scenarios, using techniques from term rewriting.


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