Real World OCaml: Functional Programming for the Masses

Real World OCaml: Functional Programming for the Masses

An introduction to OCaml, an industrial-strength programming language designed for expressiveness, safety, and speed. Examples inside will help readers quickly learn how OCaml stands out as a tool for writing fast, succinct, and readable systems code.

Publication date: 25 Nov 2013

ISBN-10: 144932391X

ISBN-13: 9781449323912

Paperback: 510 pages

Views: 2,006

Real World OCaml: Functional Programming for the Masses

Real World OCaml: Functional Programming for the Masses An introduction to OCaml, an industrial-strength programming language designed for expressiveness, safety, and speed. Examples inside will help readers quickly learn how OCaml stands out as a tool for writing fast, succinct, and readable systems code.
Tag(s): Functional Programming
Publication date: 25 Nov 2013
ISBN-10: 144932391X
ISBN-13: 9781449323912
Paperback: 510 pages
Views: 2,006
Document Type: N/A
Publisher: O’Reilly Media, Inc.
License: Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License
Post time: 16 Mar 2016 07:00:00
Summary/Excerpts of (and not a substitute for) the Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License:
You are free to:

Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format for any purpose, even commercially.

The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

Click here to read the full license.
About the Book:

Real World OCaml is aimed at programmers who have some experience with conventional programming languages, but not specifically with statically typed functional programming. Depending on your background, many of the concepts we cover will be new, including traditional functional-programming techniques like higher-order functions and immutable data types, as well as aspects of OCaml's powerful type and module systems.

If you already know OCaml, this book may surprise you. Core redefines most of the standard namespace to make better use of the OCaml module system and expose a number of powerful, reusable data structures by default. Older OCaml code will still interoperate with Core, but you may need to adapt it for maximal benefit. All the new code that we write uses Core, and we believe the Core model is worth learning; it's been successfully used on large, multimillion-line codebases and removes a big barrier to building sophisticated applications in OCaml.

Code that uses only the traditional compiler standard library will always exist, but there are other online resources for learning how that works. Real World OCaml focuses on the techniques the authors have used in their personal experience to construct scalable, robust software systems.




About The Author(s)


Jason Hickey is a Software Engineer at Google, where he is responsible for Computing Infrastructure. His research interests include programming languages, formal methods, and compilers for fault-tolerant distributed systems and high-confidence control. He was an assistant professor at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) until 2008, where he developed new courses in modern operating systems, compilers, and programming language semantics.

Jason Hickey

Jason Hickey is a Software Engineer at Google, where he is responsible for Computing Infrastructure. His research interests include programming languages, formal methods, and compilers for fault-tolerant distributed systems and high-confidence control. He was an assistant professor at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) until 2008, where he developed new courses in modern operating systems, compilers, and programming language semantics.


Anil Madhavapeddy is an engineer at Docker, and a University Lecturer at the University of Cambridge. He has worked in a variety of senior architecture, engineering, product management, sales and "whatever it takes" roles in industry (SMLXL) as well as government and research (SML). He completed his PhD in 2006 at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in the Systems Research Group. His thesis and various academic publications are available here. His research goal is to improve the security, reliability and performance of the Internet.

Anil Madhavapeddy

Anil Madhavapeddy is an engineer at Docker, and a University Lecturer at the University of Cambridge. He has worked in a variety of senior architecture, engineering, product management, sales and "whatever it takes" roles in industry (SMLXL) as well as government and research (SML). He completed his PhD in 2006 at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory in the Systems Research Group. His thesis and various academic publications are available here. His research goal is to improve the security, reliability and performance of the Internet.


Yaron Minsky is the Head of Quantitative Research and Technology at Jane Street Capital and was responsible for introducing OCaml to the company and transitioning its architecture. He obtained his PhD in Computer Science from Cornell University, where he studied distributed systems. Yaron has lectured, blogged and written about OCaml for years, with articles published in Communications of the ACM and the Journal of Functional Programming.

Yaron Minsky

Yaron Minsky is the Head of Quantitative Research and Technology at Jane Street Capital and was responsible for introducing OCaml to the company and transitioning its architecture. He obtained his PhD in Computer Science from Cornell University, where he studied distributed systems. Yaron has lectured, blogged and written about OCaml for years, with articles published in Communications of the ACM and the Journal of Functional Programming.


Book Categories
Sponsors
Icons8, a free icon pack