Stuff Goes Bad: Erlang in Anger

Stuff Goes Bad: Erlang in Anger

A collection of tips and tricks to help understand where failures come from, and a dictionary of different code snippets and practices that helped developers debug production systems that were built in Erlang.

Publication date: 06 Apr 2016

ISBN-10: n/a

ISBN-13: n/a

Paperback: 93 pages

Views: 1,506

Type: Book

Publisher: n/a

License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International

Post time: 30 Oct 2016 05:00:00

Stuff Goes Bad: Erlang in Anger

Stuff Goes Bad: Erlang in Anger A collection of tips and tricks to help understand where failures come from, and a dictionary of different code snippets and practices that helped developers debug production systems that were built in Erlang.
Tag(s): Functional Programming
Publication date: 06 Apr 2016
ISBN-10: n/a
ISBN-13: n/a
Paperback: 93 pages
Views: 1,506
Document Type: Book
Publisher: n/a
License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International
Post time: 30 Oct 2016 05:00:00
Summary/Excerpts of (and not a substitute for) the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International:
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From the Introduction:
Fred Hebert wrote:Erlang is a programming environment where the approach taken is equivalent to the human body’s immune system, whereas most other languages only care about hygiene to make sure no germ enters the body. Both forms appear extremely important to me. Almost every environment offers varying degrees of hygiene. Nearly no other environment offers the immune system where errors at run time can be dealt with and seen as survivable. 

Because the system doesn’t collapse the first time something bad touches it, Erlang/OTP also allows you to be a doctor. You can go in the system, pry it open right there in production, carefully observe everything inside as it runs, and even try to fix it interactively. To continue with the analogy, Erlang allows you to perform extensive tests to diagnose the problem and various degrees of surgery (even very invasive surgery), without the patients needing to sit down or interrupt their daily activities. 

This book intends to be a little guide about how to be the Erlang medic in a time of war. It is first and foremost a collection of tips and tricks to help understand where failures come from, and a dictionary of different code snippets and practices that helped developers debug production systems that were built in Erlang. 

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About The Author(s)


Frederic Trottier-Hebert is the author of Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good!, a free online (also paid for, on paper) book designed to teach Erlang. He works as a lead member of technical staff on Heroku's routing components, helping design, program, maintain, and operate large scale distributed systems in the cloud, more often than not written in Erlang.

Fred Hebert

Frederic Trottier-Hebert is the author of Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good!, a free online (also paid for, on paper) book designed to teach Erlang. He works as a lead member of technical staff on Heroku's routing components, helping design, program, maintain, and operate large scale distributed systems in the cloud, more often than not written in Erlang.


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