The Digital Person - Technology and Privacy in the Information Age

The Digital Person - Technology and Privacy in the Information Age

Aims to rethink longstanding notions of privacy to grapple with the consequences of living in an Information Age.

Publication date: 31 Dec 2004

ISBN-10: 0814740375

ISBN-13: 9780814740378

Paperback: 283 pages

Views: 17,798

The Digital Person - Technology and Privacy in the Information Age

The Digital Person - Technology and Privacy in the Information Age Aims to rethink longstanding notions of privacy to grapple with the consequences of living in an Information Age.
Tag(s): Hackers and Computer Philosophy
Publication date: 31 Dec 2004
ISBN-10: 0814740375
ISBN-13: 9780814740378
Paperback: 283 pages
Views: 17,798
Document Type: N/A
Publisher: New York University Press
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Post time: 28 Mar 2008 04:19:35
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Excerpts from the Introduction:

We are in the midst of an information revolution, and we are only beginning to understand its implications. The past few decades have witnessed a dramatic transformation in the way we shop, bank, and go about our daily business—changes that have resulted in an unprecedented proliferation of records and data. Small details that were once captured in dim memories or fading scraps of paper are now preserved forever in the digital minds of computers, in vast databases with fertile fields of personal data. Our wallets are stuffed with ATM cards, calling cards, frequent shopper cards, and credit cards—all of which can be used to record where we are and what we do. Every day, rivulets of information stream into electric brains to be sifted, sorted, rearranged, and combined in hundreds of different ways. Digital technology enables the preservation of the minutia of our everyday comings and goings, of our likes and dislikes, of who we are and what we own. It is ever more possible to create an electronic collage that covers much of a person's life—a life captured in records, a digital person composed in the collective computer networks of the world.

We are currently confronting the rise of what I refer to as "digital dossiers." A dossier is a collection of detailed data about an individual. Dossiers are used in European courts to assemble information about a person in order to reach a judgment. Today, through the use of computers, dossiers are being constructed about all of us. Data is digitized into binary numerical form, which enables computers to store and manipulate it with unprecedented efficiency. There are hundreds of companies that are constructing gigantic databases of psychological profiles, amassing data about an individual's race, gender, income, hobbies, and purchases. Shards of data from our daily existence are now being assembled and analyzed—to investigate backgrounds, check credit, market products, and make a wide variety of decisions affecting our lives.

This book is about how we should understand and protect privacy in light of these profound technological developments. Our old conceptions of privacy are not up to the task. Much of the law pertaining to privacy is based on these conceptions, and as a result, it has failed to resolve the emerging privacy problems created by digital dossiers. This book aims to rethink longstanding notions of privacy to grapple with the consequences of living in an Information Age.
 




About The Author(s)


Daniel J. Solove is the John Harlan Marshall Research Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School.

He founded TeachPrivacy, a company providing privacy and data security training.

One of the world’s leading experts in privacy law, Solove is the author of 10 books and more than 50 articles.

Daniel J. Solove

Daniel J. Solove is the John Harlan Marshall Research Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School.

He founded TeachPrivacy, a company providing privacy and data security training.

One of the world’s leading experts in privacy law, Solove is the author of 10 books and more than 50 articles.


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